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Hannibal A Hellenistic Life PDF ✓ Hannibal A PDF

If history is written by the victors can we really know Hannibal whose portrait we see through the eyes of his Roman conquerors? Hannibal lived a life of incredible feats of daring and survival massive military engagements and ultimate defeat A citizen of Carthage and military commander in Punic Spain he famously marched his war elephants and huge army over the Alps into Rome's own heartland to fight the Second Punic War Yet the Romans were the ultimate victors They eventually captured and destroyed Carthage and thus it was they who wrote the legend of Hannibal a brilliant and worthy enemy whose defeat represented military glory for Rome In this groundbreaking biography Eve MacDonald expands the memory of Hannibal beyond his military feats and tactics She considers him in the wider context of the society and vibrant culture of Carthage which shaped him and his family employing archaeological findings and documentary sources not only from Rome but also the wider Mediterranean world of the third century BC MacDonald also analyzes Hannibal's legend over the millennia exploring how statuary Jacobean tragedy opera nineteenth century fiction and other depictions illuminate the character of one of the most fascinating military personalities in all of historyIf history is written by the victors can we really know Hannibal whose portrait we see through the eyes of his Roman conquerors? Hannibal lived a life of incredible feats of daring and survival massive military engagements and ultimate defeat A citizen of Carthage and military commander in Punic Spain he famously marched his war elephants and huge army over the Alps into Rome's own heartland to fight the Second Punic War Yet the Romans were the ultimate victors They eventually captured and destroyed Carthage and thus it was they who wrote the legend of Hannibal a brilliant and worthy enemy whose defeat represented military glory for Rome In this groundbreaking biography Eve MacDonald expands the memory of Hannibal beyond his military feats and tactics She considers him in the wider context of the society and vibrant culture of Carthage which shaped him and his family employing archaeological findings and documentary sources not only from Rome but also the wider Mediterranean world of the third century BC MacDonald also analyzes Hannibal's legend over the millennia exploring how statuary Jacobean tragedy opera nineteenth century fiction and other depictions illuminate the character of one of the most fascinating military personalities in all of historyIf history is written by the victors can we really know Hannibal whose portrait we see through the eyes of his Roman conquerors? Hannibal lived a life of incredible feats of daring and survival massive military engagements and ultimate defeat A citizen of Carthage and military commander in Punic Spain he famously marched his war elephants and huge army over the Alps into Rome's own heartland to fight the Second Punic War Yet the Romans were the ultimate victors They eventually captured and destroyed Carthage and thus it was they who wrote the legend of Hannibal a brilliant and worthy enemy whose defeat represented military glory for Rome In this groundbreaking biography Eve MacDonald expands the memory of Hannibal beyond his military feats and tactics She considers him in the wider context of the society and vibrant culture of Carthage which shaped him and his family employing archaeological findings and documentary sources not only from Rome but also the wider Mediterranean world of the third century BC MacDonald also analyzes Hannibal's legend over the millennia exploring how statuary Jacobean tragedy opera nineteenth century fiction and other depictions illuminate the character of one of the most fascinating military personalities in all of history


12 thoughts on “Hannibal A Hellenistic Life

  1. says:

    I have read a good many authors on the war with Hannibal but I must pay the most generous tribute to this wonderfully constructed and exciting book Eve MacDonald tells the story of the Second Punic War with an insight and clarity of overview that makes this book exceptionalAfter the disasters for Rome at Lake Trasimene and Cannae the author explains the astonishing Roman cool headedness and how the Senate in concert with capable Roman generals patiently yet brilliantly rendered a military genius and legend into almost a hapless figure trapped with his too small army in the toe of Italy while the Romans swept away other Carthaginian armies in Spain and Italy and took city after city including New Carthage Syracuse Capua and TarentumThe dominating decisive impact of the Roman navy in the war is outlined clearly as is the colossal cost in human life of this conflict to both sides including the defeat and deaths of Hannibal's two younger brothersIndeed the Roman victory virtually invokes a sense of manifest destiny in that the survival and ultimate victory of Greco Roman culture over 'Middle Eastern' oriented Carthage became a catalyst during so many future centuries for the ultimate rise of the West Today there is the firm footprint of classical values and culture today across Europe Russia North and South America Australasia sub Saharan Africa and many places beyondIt is surely not an exaggeration to infer that Hannibal's ultimate failure helped to safeguard the artistic scientific and rational values which have continued to underpin so many good aspects of Western civilisation to this day While the hubris to nemesis story of Hannibal and Carthage is redolent in human tragedy the ultimate victory of Rome is perhaps something that a modern citizen of the world might reflect upon with than a little relief While the likes of Hannibal were to some degree connected to Greek culture surely Ms MacDonald's 'multicultural' Carthage taken as a whole was a good deal less 'Hellenistic' and a lot 'Levantine' than the Greek or Roman polities that it so bitterly opposed for over 300 years?Nevertheless this author can and should write brilliant books on other gripping tales of Greece and Rome